Roasted Red Peppers and Eggplant, A Dichotomy

Roasted Red Peppers & Eggplant, A Dichotomy

October 22, 2007

My Love,

What a great weekend!

Last night I was inspired to cook. I prepared the food with you in mind and the feelings of Joy I receive daily by your example.

– Roasted red peppers soaked in olive oil, soy sauce, apple cider, vinegar, and lemon
– Roasted eggplant in olive oil, garlic, and salt to taste
– Pita bread

Please enjoy. Warm the bread to awaken it. Add lemon if it’s too salty for your palate.
( I did not use a knife, I used only my hands to prepare the food)

My appreciation for you brought me here to this present moment. You’ve also inspired me to write so here are my thoughts for the day.

For now, I am soaked in love and I am loving it. I am living in the Flow.

I live now in accordance with my nature. I do not go against the way of things. I act in harmony with the present moment to connect and know the truth of just what to do.

It is called Living in the Flow in this temporary world of many changes and changing – the physical world of “10,000 things” as Lao Tzu calls it.

I focus my attention not on the food, the creation. Rather, I try to be aware in the silent knowing of what’s behind all acts of creation. We cannot know the Creator, if we focus on the creation.

I purposely did not remove the seeds from the one eggplant. The eggplant offers a silky texture and pleasant fragrance. Joined with garlic, it gives you that “bite” reminding me of the duality and dichotomy of the Universe, and yet it is all one.

So watch out, the garlic has a strong taste and the eggplant its opposing flavor. The mixture of apple cider, vinegar and lemon is mildly calmed by the soy sauce. The olive oil is the equalizer.

So I turned inward and experience the essence of the One who allowed this eggplant to emerge from a tiny seed. I look at life as going beyond this worldly perspective, to live from the inner knowing that our true essence is not of the world (being in the world), but not of this world of “10,000 things”.

On an aside, I am beginning to get the idea of the word “Two”, now seems funny to me these days.

The word “Two” keeps reminding me of its Unity. In the end, not Two but really One. Just the opposite end of the pole of creation. We are all a Perfect One, Perfect Creation, Perfect Love, Perfect Silent knowing, Joy!

Catherine

oooooxxxxx

Here is the 8th verse of the The Tao Te Ching,

Living in the Flow

The supreme good is like water,

Which nourishes all things without trying to.

It flows to low places loathed by all men,

Therefore, it is like the Tao

Live in accordance with the nature of things,

In dwelling, be close to the land.

In meditation, go deep in the heart.

In dealing with others, be gentle and kind.

Stand by your word.

Govern with equity.

Be timely in choosing the right moment.

One who lives in accordance with nature

does not go against the way of things.

He moves in harmony with the present moment,

Always knowing the truth of just what to do.

My commentary:

You want to savor reading the 8th verse, read it slowly, and let it seep in your tongue where we have tons of saliva, attached to flavors and emotions, that’s why kissing is so good.

After practicing my TM (Transcendental Meditation) in the mornings, I read a book or maybe two and from the transcendent state (state beyond thought or thinking, thinking state, or busy mind). From the transcendent state, it is easy to write, where your thoughts are most powerful, and is coming from what I can describe, inspiration. From this state my understanding becomes deeper, on a cellular level. We have trillions of cells, each one a point of consciousness, intelligent, and capable of achieving its own intelligent balance, without our say so.

Because I savor and practice the inspirations from the books I read, it was easy to write what I have just shared with you on this piece of inspired writing, I call Roasted Red Peppers and Eggplant, a dichotomy of Two, but Really One, a Perfect One.

If you like what you read here, I recommend reading:

Dr. Wayne Dyer’s book,Change your Thoughts, Change your Life

Here’s a reference from Wikipedia:

Laozi (Western translation = Lao Tzu) is traditionally regarded as the author of the Daodejing (Tao Te Ching), though the identity of its author(s) and/or compiler(s) has been debated throughout history. It is one of the most significant treatises in Chinese cosmogony. As with most other ancient Chinese philosophers, Laozi often explains his ideas by way of paradox, analogy, appropriation of ancient sayings, repetition, symmetry, rhyme, and rhythm.

The Tao Te Ching, often called simply Laozi after its reputed author, describes the Dao (or Tao) as the source and ideal of all existence: it is unseen, but not transcendent, immensely powerful yet supremely humble, being the root of all things. According to the Daodejing, humans have no special place within the Dao, being just one of its many (“ten thousand”) manifestations. People have desires and free will (and thus are able to alter their own nature). Many act “unnaturally”, upsetting the natural balance of the Dao. The Daodejing intends to lead students to a “return” to their natural state, in harmony with Dao. Language and conventional wisdom are critically assessed. Taoism views them as inherently biased and artificial, widely using paradoxes to sharpen the point.

Word Clearing:

Cosmogony-definition: Cosmogony, or cosmogeny, is any scientific theory concerning the coming into existence or origin of the universe, or about how reality came to be.

Dichotomy: a division into two especially mutually exclusive or contradictory groups or entities

I wish You All Health, All Wealth, and All Love!

Love Live, Live Love

Catherine

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